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Duh? How come.......?
#21
DUHMsg # 21 of 141 Date: Mon 12/06/1995, 4:40 pm
From: MONTY Read: 46 times

To: AIMEE
Subject: We: How come?

Its no answer but mirrors confuse me too How come when I look in a
mirror I see an enantiomorph of me on either side but not top and bottom
even when I lay on my side?

Can u tell me how come?
Reply
#22
DUHMsg # 22 of 141 Date: Mon 12/06/1995, 4:46 pm
From: AIMEE Read: 54 times [1 Reply]

To: All
Subject: Wind

Where does the Wind come from? What drives it?

Hey, an honest question, I'm not being silly!

--
Reply
#23
DUHMsg # 23 of 141 Date: Mon 12/06/1995, 5:28 pm
From: BO PEEP Read: 50 times

To: AIMEE
Subject: Re: We: How come?

>>Its no answer but mirrors confuse me too How come when I look in a
>>mirror I see an enantiomorph of me on either side but not top and bottom
>>even when I lay on my side?
> can u tell me what an enantiomorph is?

When I look in the mirror all I see is dust - does the enantiomorph put it
there?
Reply
#24
DUHMsg # 24 of 141 Date: Mon 12/06/1995, 8:15 pm
From: WITCH WON Read: 48 times

To: All
Subject: Re: Wind


Good evening Aimee,

Wind,... and who hasn't suffered from it? No, only kidding! Wind is
cause by pressure differentials in the atmosphere. Hot air is lighter than
cool air and tends to rise. Something has to move into fill the space left
by the rising hot air, and that movement just happens to be the wind. This
is a gross simplification, but hey, it works. :-}

Regards,
Witch Won.
Reply
#25
DUHMsg # 25 of 141 Date: Sat 12/08/1995, 9:35 pm
From: SKIDMARK Read: 43 times [1 Reply]

To: IDIOT SAVANT
Subject: Re: We: How come?

>Aimee:
>>Its no answer but mirrors confuse me too How come when I look in a
>>mirror I see an enantiomorph of me on either side but not top and bottom
>>even when I lay on my side?
>>
>>Can u tell me how come?
>
> I could give you some crap about reflection of light, but I think it's
>more that your reflection is too smart to do handstands.
>
>"I'm an Idiot, & I'm OK..."
So how come i look better in the the mirror in the afternoon than i do in
the morning?
Reply
#26
DUHMsg # 26 of 141 Date: Sun 13/08/1995, 2:23 pm
From: AIMEE Read: 41 times [1 Reply]

To: SKIDMARK
Subject: Re: We: How come?

>So how come i look better in the the mirror in the afternoon than i do in
>the morning?

It's called 'morning face'. While you're asleep your face forgets where to
put everything, and after waking up it spends a bit of time remembering.
takes a while, and face exercises help. A good obedience school can do
wonders to combat this.
Reply
#27
DUHMsg # 27 of 141 Date: Sun 13/08/1995, 7:55 pm
From: SKIDMARK Read: 44 times [1 Reply]

To: AIMEE
Subject: Re: We: How come?

>>So how come i look better in the the mirror in the afternoon than i do in
>>the morning?
>
>It's called 'morning face'. While you're asleep your face forgets where to
>put everything, and after waking up it spends a bit of time remembering.
>takes a while, and face exercises help. A good obedience school can do
>wonders to combat this.
>

But why does it take longer the older i get?

Is my muscle turning to fat? Smile
Reply
#28
DUHMsg # 28 of 141 Date: Mon 14/08/1995, 4:44 pm
From: AIMEE Read: 41 times

To: SKIDMARK
Subject: Re: We: How come?

>>It's called 'morning face'. While you're asleep your face forgets where to
>>put everything, and after waking up it spends a bit of time remembering.
>>takes a while, and face exercises help. A good obedience school can do
>>wonders to combat this.
>
>But why does it take longer the older i get?
>
>Is my muscle turning to fat? Smile

It's senility.. your memory goes, and after a while you forget what your
face should look like.

That would explain old man's ears :>
Reply
#29
DUHMsg # 29 of 141 Date: Mon 19/02/1996, 1:53 pm
From: AIMEE Read: 45 times

To: All
Subject: Why do we get goosebumps?

Why do we get goosebumps?



Is it true that opera singers can shatter glass?
================================================

No, but they could shatter crystal. The reason has to do with the structure
of these two materials. Glass is an amorphous solid that can be compared to
a handful of peanuts (molecules) randomly stuck together with jam. Crystal,
on the other hand is a crystalline solid in which the 'peanuts' are held
together in a definate pattern by a meshwork of tiny springs.

When the mesh is subjected to outside stress, the springs begin to
oscillate, creating vibration. If the stress is repeated regularly, as in
the case of the air vibrations created by a musical note, the material
begins to resonate. If the resonance is intense enough, the springs begin
to give and the crystal shatters. Glass simply absorbs the vibrations.


Why does it take less time to fly from Nth America-Europe than vice versa?
==========================================================================

Aircraft travelling west to east at high altitudes (30,000 to 35,000 feet)
exploit the so-called jet stream. Following the rotation of the Earth from
west to east, this current of air flows from the tail of the aircraft to the
nose, thus adding to the power of the plane's own propulsion system.


Why is a circle divided up into 360 degrees?
============================================

The subdivision of a circle dates from the days of the Babylonians (Approx
2000 BC), whose life was organised by the apparant movement of the sun.
Based on the agricultural cycle - in which the sun made a full turn of the
sky - scribes used a schematic year of 360 days. Thus the sun (which the
Babylonians thought described a perfect circle) was divided into 360 angles,
and by analogy, all circles into 360 degrees.


Why do Africans have such curly hair?
=====================================

Evolution has equipped the peoples of central Africa, where temperatures can
soar to 40 degrees, with an effective weapon against overheating of the
scalp and hence of the brain (cerebral tissue starts to degenerate at above
41 degrees). The insulating 'cushion' of tight, wiry curls, plus the
natural oil of the scalp, help keep temperatures below the danger level.


Why do traffic lights use red to indicate stop?
===============================================

Red is the colour that most clearly indicates danger. In Britain, in the
last century, all motorised vehicles were preceded by a man carrying a red
flag, who cleared the way. The railways adopted red signals because white
ones could easily be confused with house or streetlights.


Why don't we notice the moment we go from waking to sleeping?
=============================================================

The two main centres of sleep and wakefulness are situated at the base of
the brain. As sleep begins to approach, these centres release increasing
amounts of the neuro-transmitter serotonin. This in turn inhibits the
activity of the neurons, which control conscious awareness of wakefulness.


Why does hair get darker as we get older, and then white later on in life?
==========================================================================

A baby's developing hair becomes impregnated with thousands of pigment cells
called melonocytes. These produce two types of pigment: eumelanin, which
will result in black or dark brown hair, and pheomelonin, which will result
in blonde or ginger hair.

Hair darkens from birth onwards because melanocytes intensify their activity
up to the age of about 15, and then stabilise up to the age of 30. After
that the production of pigments slows down, and hair starts to turn grey.
When the melanocytes reduce their actifity, hair goes white, the natural
colour of its proteins.


Why do we get goosebumps?
=========================

This is an indication that the body's defence mechanisms are functioning.
When hair follicles constrict in response to low temperature, causing
goosebumps, they also squeeze fat from the sebaceous gland to protect
against the cold.


--:>
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#30
DUHMsg # 30 of 141 Date: Thu 22/02/1996, 1:12 pm

From: HELLCAT Read: 49 times [1 Reply]

To: All
Subject: how

How come we can't see air? It's sposed to be atoms or somesuch thing flying
around making the stuff, so how come we can't see it?

And here's another one. Our inner ear is so suseptable to noise, how come
we can't hear the blood flowing around inside our heads? shouldn't it be
deafening?

Oh and another thing. If Multiple schlorosis (sp?) is said to be caused by
(read this today) 'nerve cells not functioning because the insulation of
nerve fibres is attacked by the body's immune system', then why can't they
put people who have been diagnosed on anti-rejection drugs that they use for
transplant patients? Wouldn't that fix the problem? Sounds obvious to me.

One last thing. If cats always land on their feet when they fall out of a
tree, how come my head hurts? 8#)

=Meow=
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